Jews Of Uganda Are Torn Apart Over A Bitter Sibling Rivalry

Posted on February 17th, 2019
Tonny Onyulo for The Forward 

 

During a recent Shabbat service here, Rabbi Gershom Sizomu led dozens of worshippers in a prayer for unity. Women sang psalms. Children clapped. Men wearing yarmulkes played drums and guitars.

Locally known in Uganda as Abayudaya or “the people of Judah,” they practice Conservative Judaism with an African flair — and right now, need exactly that prayer. A conflict is now splitting the community, which is almost a century old.

Read more: 

The Demons Of Intersectionality

Posted on February 10th, 2019
By Hannah Jannol for The Jewish Week

For many in the Jewish community, the concept of intersectionality — and the politics it has spawned — is associated with the demonization of Israel, Zionism, pro-Israel college students and Jewish women. Women’s March co-leader Linda Sarsour famously went so far as to claim that, in the spirit of intersectionality, feminism must exclude Zionism.

 

Continue reading.

Canadian Archives Acquires Nazi Study of North American Jewry

Posted on February 3rd, 2019
Five Towns Jewish Times

A rare booklet just acquired by the Canadian National Archives contains a Nazi study of North American Jewry apparently intended to facilitate their annihilation in the event of a Nazi victory over the United States and Canada.

According to Israeli news site Mako, the book was written by German linguist Heinz Klaus, a Nazi researcher who traveled to the United States in 1936. Using a network of American Nazi supporters, he compiled information on the Jewish communities in North America into a report published in 1944.

Continue reading.

TALMUD-INSPIRED LEARNING CRAZE SWEEPS SOUTH KOREA

Posted on January 27th, 2019
BY TIM ALPER/JTA in JPost


“It opened up a whole world of unexpressed thoughts and feelings,” said Kim Hye-kyung.


The mother of two lives in study-mad South Korea, a nation where parents fork over a combined $17 billion on private tutoring every year. Children start early – 83 percent of 5-year-olds receive private education — and the pace keeps intensifying until, at age 18, students take the dreaded eight-hour suneung university entrance exam. Flunk the suneung and your job prospects could nosedive. Pass with flying colors and you may land a coveted spot at a top-ranked university.

Continue reading.

New law excuses Brazilian Jewish students from exams, classes on Shabbat and holidays

Posted on January 13th, 2019



RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) — A new law in Brazil allows Jewish and non-Jewish students to skip school exams and classes for religious reasons.


The students are permitted to be absent on any date in which, according to their religious precepts, the exercise of activities is prohibited, according to the legislation. For Jewish students, it means Shabbat and holidays such as Passover, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.


Continue reading.
 

Pages

CBS News & Events

Saturday, February 23, 2019 - 5:30pm
Sunday, February 24, 2019 - 10:45am
Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 7:30pm